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36 Circular Road- For Sale

 

 

Where outstanding heritage attributes are intertwined with exceptional contemporary appointments

 

Eminent historian Dr. George Story, when writing about his own home on Southside Road, in April of 1975, said that 34 and 36 Circular Rd were indeed built by Southcott.

 

John Thomas Southcott was born in St. Johnís in 1853. His father James and his uncle John, had come to St. Johnís from Exeter, England in 1847 to assist in the rebuilding of the City after the 1846 fire. They were, for most of the next 50 years, the major contractors in the City involved in both construction and design, operating under the name of J. & J.T. Southcott, and no firm had such a marked influence on the islandís architecture as did this firm. The range of their capabilities was profound as they built both the Heartís Content Cable Station and the St. Johnís Athenaeum, together with such residential properties as 115-117 Gower Street, Park Place on Rennies Mill Rd, Park House on Military Road, Devon Row on Duckworth St. , and many houses that were constructed after the fire of 1892.

 

When building the Heartís Content Cable Station, it was said of James Southcott that he was: ďhard but honest: he would not drive a nail free, but what he said he would do, I could always rely on being doneĒ.

 

After an apprenticeship with J. & J.T. Southcott, John Thomas was sent to Exeter to study architecture with W.R. Best, who had been in Newfoundland from 1849-1855. Best was an architect and artist and during his time in Newfoundland he drew ten views of buildings in the City which were lithographed by W. Spreat and published by Frederick R. Page of St. Johnís. Best also drew ďA View of the Harbour and Town of St. JohnísĒ which was also published by Page. These views represent to this day, the best collection of illustrations of St. Johnís and its early 19th century architecture and are a testament to the capabilities of John Southcottís mentor and teacher.

 

John Southcottís return to St. Johnís in 1876 saw the general introduction of the Second Empire style to Newfoundland, which has come to characterize the architecture of the City. Its form and embellishments are outstanding, with concave-curved mansard roof, bonnet topped dormers, decorative cornices under the eaves, and bay windows. His work became known as the Southcott style and each year, in Southcottís honour, the Newfoundland Historic Trust presents the Southcott Awards for excellence in restoration of heritage structures.

 

36 Circular exemplifies the best of Southcott architecture as referenced above.

 

The interior heritage appointments are exceptional with ornate plaster ceilings, rosettes, plaster cornice mouldings, original doors and door trim including an outstanding arched door between the living room and dining room with glazed side light.

 

There are numerous original fireplaces.

 

The main level has a very large entry hall / foyer, large living room and dining room, half bathroom and a spectacular open concept kitchen by Artistic, which incorporates den space with exposed brick fireplace and eating area. Off the eating area is access to the substantial deck. The 6 burner propane stove will excite the gourmand.

 

The upgrades have included new cape cod siding, update electrical, new windows, new roof, a combination of rigid pink, spray foam and cellulose insulation, etc.

 

The attic contains a family room, office two bedrooms and space for a craft room.

 

The property landscaping will appeal to the gardener and there is an abundance of parking space.

 

The second level has four substantial bedrooms including the master with contemporary ensuite with custom shower and soaker tub. The master also comes with a walk in closet.

 

The home boasts about 4200 sq ft on three levels in addition to the basement which has about 1000 sq ft.

 

Asking price is $719,000

 

For a private viewing, please call Chris OíDea at 685-6559

 

Enjoy the remaining photos

 

Click thumbnail below to enlarge image:

 

 


 

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